National Career Institute123-456-7890

Phlebotomy Technician (90 contact hours)

 

Continuing Occupational Education: Educational activities or experiences designed to assist in the development of knowledge and skills with the goal of maintaining or upgrading one’s current professional occupation These programs are included in the NJ State Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) and are not on the Council on Educational Occupation (COE) approved program list:

Phlebotomy is an extremely important job in the medical field. At its most basic, the job of a phlebotomy technician is to draw blood from patients or blood donors. Because of the job specialization, anyone with an interest in becoming a phlebotomy technician will need to complete a special phlebotomy program, such as the one we offer at the National Career Institute. Upon completion, you can acquire additional credential by challenging the national certification exams and become Certified Phlebotomy Technician.

Becoming a Phlebotomy Technician

Anyone who wants to obtain work as a professional phlebotomy technician will be required to provide certification of some kind. This is because it’s a challenging job that requires both physical skill and mental fortitude.

Phlebotomy technicians must be comfortable with the act of drawing blood, must be able to draw blood properly to prevent injuries to the patient or donor and must also be able to work under pressure in emergency situations.

Phlebotomy technicians should also have a pleasant and calming demeanor as well as the ability to communicate clearly. Some patients might fear needles or be uncomfortable giving blood. A phlebotomy technician needs to have the people skills to be able to put the patient or donor at ease.

As far as the actual tasks that phlebotomy technicians are responsible for, these include the following:

  • Explaining the procedures they’re doing step-by-step, in layman’s terms, to the patient or donor.
  • Properly drawing blood and applying bandages and pressure once the blood has been drawn.
  • Being able to take the patient or donor’s blood pressure, pulse and respiration readings.
  • Updating the patient’s records.
  • Cleaning and sterilizing the equipment that they used.
  • Preparing stains and reagents.
  • Sending samples to the lab for testing.

Our Phlebotomy Technician Program

Our program provides students with the knowledge and skill set that they need to become a successful phlebotomy technician. Students will take courses on the anatomy of the human body, the physiology of the human body, concepts and procedures of blood collection, and an overview of diseases related to each anatomical system. Students will also learn about blood sampling procedures, laboratory safety, venipuncture techniques and more.

Phlebotomy Technician Career Opportunities

Phlebotomy technicians are needed throughout the medical-care industry. Once a student has completed our phlebotomy technician program, they will be able to find work in hospitals, physician’s offices, donation facilities, laboratories and any other setting where blood needs to be drawn and analyzed. Additionally, phlebotomy technicians can further their career by becoming certified as a DPT (Donor Phlebotomy Technician), which will qualify them to work in a blood collection center.

As far as job outlook goes, there will always be a need for phlebotomy technicians, especially as the population continues to increase. According to the Department of Labor, the growth rate for phlebotomy technician jobs is predicted to be around 25 percent from 2014 to 2024, well above the average growth rate for all occupations, which is seven percent.

There’s a great demand for phlebotomy technicians that’s only expected to grow. For information about enrolling in our phlebotomy technician program, contact us at the National Career Institute today.


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